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June 14, 2010

FAKE VIDEOS OF ISRAEL ABOUT THE FREEDOM FLOTILLA ATTACK EXPOSED (MUST SEE!!!)

AND ONE HOUR RAW FOOTAGE

“I think this is the beginning of the end of the siege”

bandannie : I have my doubts about that when I read Abbas Quisling’s statement at the White House

I think a number of people are starting to feel that way in Gaza, although probably not a majority, yet. Hope is scarce, and people can’t stand to have it dashed too many times, or even to voice it publicly. The end of the siege will give the people living here in Gaza some freedom from overwhelming psychic pressure, the hardest thing to begin to understand as an outsider, and also to fix their infrastructure and begin to fix the economy. The recent ILO report gives a summary of the scale of the damage incurred by ongoing “closure,” the Israeli euphemism for imprisonment.

A leading Palestinian industrialist called Gaza a “graveyard of industries.” The tunnel economy provides consumer goods to fill the stores in the Rimal, enough fuel for private use for those families that can afford it, and low-quality building materials. Production plants are shuttered or destroyed. Most workers cannot earn a decent living. The average daily wage in 2009 was 71.5 shekelim in the public sector, 43.7 shekelim in the private sector. With unemployment as officially measured at 39.3 percent, most of the population is basically excluded from the cash economy. Many rely on credit to purchase basic food items—stores have books in which people pay their tab monthly, or when they can. That unemployment rate is probably an underestimate. Workers who haven’t been formally laid off but neither work nor receive wages are classifies as “temporarily absent employees,” rather than unemployed.

Amidst this devastation, children cannot enjoy schooling, and there are few leisure activities. Gaza has long been marked by a bifurcated social structure—those with cash employment and those without meaningful employment—and that bifurcation is becoming starker, as some profit from the recent processes, especially tunnel operators and those catering to the NGOs and journalists who jet in, and those whose economic and thus social lives remained “crushed.” One observer points out, “If this state of affairs goes on, the long-term effects on the social fabric, and hence on the peace process, will be disastrous.” 60 percent of the population is food insecure. Gazan families are “exhausting coping mechanisms.”

Gaza is a worst-case example of ongoing trends within the broader Palestinian economy. As the Palestinian Authority’s Minister of National Economy comments, the “Palestinian private sector is caged.” Israeli military occupation has underdeveloped the territories, and in Gaza prevented even dependent capitalist development from taking place through denial of access to the raw inputs needed for materiel improvement and production—water and land. Sara Roy has called this “de-development.” The multifaceted closure policy has fragmented the West Bank, cut off East Jerusalem, and placed a barrier between Gaza and the West Bank. Economies of scale are impossible, and so Palestinian industry is basically uncompetitive.

The West Bank cannot effectively trade with the population of Gaza, and faces further constraints from the Apartheid Wall and the impossibly difficult Allenby Bridge, to Jordan. Paltrade, which monitors commercial crossings into ’48, lists a range of high transaction costs: the expense and inconvenience of being forced to “palletize” goods according to absurdly strict limitations, and (I think deliberately) lengthy waiting, transfer, and inspection times associated with the “prevailing back-to-back trucking system, as well as the higher risk of damage to products.”

The struggle to break the siege on Gaza is unfortunately a defensive action against the ongoing Israeli strategy of territorial and political, and, it hopes, ideological and national fragmentation and splintering of the Palestinian people, something that began at the physical level with the Nakba, qualitatively shifted with Oslo, through a legal sleight-of-hand reducing the Palestinian population by two-thirds, and walling off the West Bank from Gaza, and then accelerated further, first, at the beginning of the 2nd Intifada as movement restrictions mounted between the West Bank and Gaza and then in 2005-2007, when the siege began.

Lifting the siege partially frees the people living in Gaza. It does not stop cantonization of the Palestinian population into population centers separated from one another by Israeli territory and Israeli roads. And amidst political fragmentation, the prospect of a Bangladesh-Pakistan “solution” looms.

source

انشودة اسطول الحرية.wmv

UK : PEACE ACTIVISTS AND TV CAMERAMAN ASSAULTED BY TESCO SECURITY STAFF

ASSAULTED BY TESCO SECURITY STAFF

A dozen pro-Palestinian activists and an Israeli film cameraman recording material for a news documentary faced aggressive store security staff during a peaceful protest about Israeli goods in a large Tesco store in Leytonstone, northeast London on Sunday June 13.

“I was shocked at the behaviour of Tesco’s security staff towards our relaxed, cheerful and totally unthreatening action,” said Ellie Merton, chairwoman of the Waltham Forest Palestine Solidarity Campaign (WFPSC).

“We were holding up examples of produce from illegal Israeli settlements and stolen Palestinian land, chanting to urge shoppers to join the boycott campaign. Then out of nowhere two burly security guards pounced on the Israeli Channel 10 cameraman, seized his equipment and then attempted to confiscate all cameras being used by us and members of the public.”

Protesters calmly stood their ground, stressed the peaceful nature of their protest and insisted on being allowed to present a letter to the store management asking them not to stock Israeli goods. Other members of staff intervened and accompanied activists, now singing a boycott song led by professional soprano Deborah Fink, to the customer services desk.

Walthamstow resident Josephine Tyrconnell-Fay said: “I didn’t think much of the duty manager’s customer service. I had to ask her repeatedly to accept our letter, in contrast to other supermarkets around the country where managements have been much more willing to understand what campaigners are doing and why.”

After Israel’s latest display of criminality, killing nine international humanitarian aid workers and peace activists on a boat taking aid to the beseiged Gaza Strip, WFPSC got together with Jews for Boycotting Israeli Goods (J-BIG) to hold Sunday’s action.

Campaigners say the sale of goods produced in Israel or its illegal settlements legitimises Israel’s criminal occupation of Palestinian lands.

By stocking these goods supermarkets are complicit in supporting the economy of a violent apartheid state that disrespects international law and undertakes ethnic cleansing.

“As consumers and activists we are proud to be part of the non-violent global campaign to hold Israel to account for its continual war crimes against Palestinians,” said Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, secretary of J-BIG.

Contacts:

Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi – 07759 024659

A dozen pro-Palestinian activists and an Israeli film cameraman recording material for a news documentary faced aggressive store security staff during a peaceful protest about Israeli goods in a large Tesco store in Leytonstone, northeast London on Sunday June 13.

“I was shocked at the behaviour of Tesco’s security staff towards our relaxed, cheerful and totally unthreatening action,” said Ellie Merton, chairwoman of the Waltham Forest Palestine Solidarity Campaign (WFPSC).

“We were holding up examples of produce from illegal Israeli settlements and stolen Palestinian land, chanting to urge shoppers to join the boycott campaign. Then out of nowhere two burly security guards pounced on the Israeli Channel 10 cameraman, seized his equipment and then attempted to confiscate all cameras being used by us and members of the public.”

Protesters calmly stood their ground, stressed the peaceful nature of their protest and insisted on being allowed to present a letter to the store management asking them not to stock Israeli goods. Other members of staff intervened and accompanied activists, now singing a boycott song led by professional soprano Deborah Fink, to the customer services desk.

Walthamstow resident Josephine Tyrconnell-Fay said: “I didn’t think much of the duty manager’s customer service. I had to ask her repeatedly to accept our letter, in contrast to other supermarkets around the country where managements have been much more willing to understand what campaigners are doing and why.”

After Israel’s latest display of criminality, killing nine international humanitarian aid workers and peace activists on a boat taking aid to the beseiged Gaza Strip, WFPSC got together with Jews for Boycotting Israeli Goods (J-BIG) to hold Sunday’s action.

Campaigners say the sale of goods produced in Israel or its illegal settlements legitimises Israel’s criminal occupation of Palestinian lands.

By stocking these goods supermarkets are complicit in supporting the economy of a violent apartheid state that disrespects international law and undertakes ethnic cleansing.

“As consumers and activists we are proud to be part of the non-violent global campaign to hold Israel to account for its continual war crimes against Palestinians,” said Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, secretary of J-BIG.

Contacts:

Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi – 07759 024659

The twelve Irish tenors

Abbas to Obama: I’m against lifting the Gaza naval blockade

The Palestinian president reportedly told Obama that lifting the naval blockade of Gaza would bolster Hamas, a move that shouldn’t be done at this stage.

By Barak Ravid

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas is opposed to lifting the naval blockade of the Gaza Strip because this would bolster Hamas, according to what he told United States President Barack Obama during their meeting at the White House Wednesday. Egypt also supports this position.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu once more put off announcing the creation of a committee of inquiry into the naval commando raid on the Gaza Strip flotilla, and the matter will not be brought before the cabinet for a vote this morning.
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and U.S. President Barack Obama

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and U.S. President Barack Obama
Photo by: Archive

Netanyahu and his advisers had hoped to announce the establishment of a committee of inquiry as early as yesterday evening for a vote in the cabinet today. Nonetheless, the Prime Minister’s Bureau said yesterday evening that the conditions have not matured for such an announcement “due to political reasons.”

Talks have been held with the U.S. administration and several European countries to rally support for the mandate of the committee of inquiry and approval of its makeup. The Americans have rejected – a number of times – Israel’s proposals and asked that a retired Supreme Court justice head the probe. The issue was resolved when Justice Yaakov Tirkel was proposed for the post.

The Americans have also been busy with the issue of sanctions against Iran at the United Nations Security Council and also with the visit to the U.S. capital by Abbas and so exchanges with Netanyahu’s bureau on the committee of inquiry were delayed.

Apparently, there is another cause for delay involving exchanges between the Americans, Israel and European countries concerning the proposed foreign observers on the committee of inquiry and their authority. One of the foreign observers on the committee will be a senior American jurist. Washington has made it clear that the administration would like at least two European observers to be involved in order to strengthen the legitimacy of the Israeli panel.

The issue of the Gaza flotilla and lifting the Israeli blockade of the Gaza Strip was the main topic of discussion between Obama and Abbas last Wednesday night.

European diplomats updated by the White House on the talks said that Abbas had stressed to Obama the need of opening the border crossings into the Gaza Strip and the easing of the siege, but only in ways that do not bolster Hamas.

One of the points that Abbas raised is that the naval blockade imposed by Israel on the Strip should not be lifted at this stage. The European diplomats said Egypt has made it clear to Israel, the U.S and the European Union that it is also opposes the lifting of the naval blockade because of the difficulty in inspecting the ships that would enter and leave the Gaza port.

Abbas told Obama that actions easing the blockage should be done with care and undertaken gradually so it will not be construed as a victory for Hamas. The Palestinian leader also stressed that the population in the Gaza Strip must be supported, and that pressure should be brought to bear on Israel to allow more goods, humanitarian assistance and building materials for reconstruction. Abbas, however, said this added aid can be done by opening land crossings and other steps that do not include the lifting of the naval blockade.

On Friday, Netanyahu met with Quartet representative Tony Blair in his office. This was the third meeting between the two during the last eight days, and centered on ways of easing the blockade on the Strip.

Senior Israeli officials and European diplomats say there is agreement that policy on the blockade should be altered, but this should be done carefully and discretely.

“There is agreement that no major declarations should be made so Hamas will not to be allowed to score points,” a source familiar with the talks with Blair said.

source

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